Friday, December 16, 2016

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Ever since I read about the prequel trilogy (and I don't think I ever heard the word "prequel" used before then, which is strange because now we have to endure its use on a daily basis) I've learned to wait. And after that trilogy wrapped up I, like millions of others, thought there would never be another Star Wars movie again... certainly not one as good as The Force Awakens. At any rate, it's an exciting time for fans of the franchise because we're entering new territory: here's a movie that doesn't focus on the saga characters. No Luke, no Leia, no Solo.

Right now we get to say, "Ooo! I can't believe another Star Wars movie is already coming out!" But how long will it be until we're saying, "Ugh, I can't believe another Star Wars movie is already coming out..."? I know they're not currently planning to pump them out with the frequency of Marvel movies, but Star Wars advertising and merchandise seems to be much more pervasive than the superhero stuff. There's that, then there's the fact I can't completely trust the corporate behemoth that is Disney, because who knows what will happen once this dizzying whirlwind of fan service begins to dissipate.

In the meantime: I can't believe there's a new Star Wars movie out!


So while I'm not among the mega fans of the series, I have dabbled in the comics, the video games, and Timothy Zahn's Heir to the Empire. Ever since playing the awesomely cinematic Shadows of the Empire, I always wanted to see a feature film spin-off of the Star Wars series. And when I went to see last year's The Force Awakens, there was this pretense that I wouldn't compare it to the original trilogy, but we all know that was impossible. Yet with Rogue One it's truly new territory—the first time we get to see a Star Wars film fresh in decades. No need to judge it against what's come before it, this one's supposed to stand on its own... at least that was my assumption.

Below there are no bigger spoilers than what you would have seen if you watched all the trailers and followed the official press. If you were adamant about not watching the trailers (in other words: stronger than I), then don't read any further, either. If you just want to know my opinion on the film: I really liked it, but while I wouldn't necessarily call it predictable, many of the major plot points weren't particularly surprising. That's the problem with prequels in general, I suppose, and I certainly liked this one better than anything in George Lucas's prequel trilogy. (And yes, I did like the prequel trilogy.)

Most of my disappointments with Rogue One are all based on my own preconceptions, which turned out to be wildly inaccurate in a lot of ways. I didn't know we were going to get CGI Tarkin, a pun-making Vader who feels a little too spry considering we mostly just see him walk around in A New Hope, and one callback after another. I knew this was a story about how the good guys managed to acquire the Death Star plans, but I didn't know it was going to rely so heavily on what came before it.

Other complaints: the trailers give away a lot more than The Force Awakens trailers did, we don't get to spend enough time with these characters before they head off for war, and—most disappointing of all—the two human leads are bland and boring in relation to the supporting cast. I'm sure Felicity Jones and Diego Luna are talented people, I just never really believed their characters' motivations, mostly because the actors aren't given a whole lot to work with here. Meanwhile Forest Whitaker makes interesting creative choices for a performance in a popcorn flick, and while I'm not a hundred percent on board with the result, the effort is nice nonetheless.

Putting all that aside, Rogue One kicks a surprising amount of ass. The film looks like a Star Wars movie, but doesn't feel like one until the final act, which actually felt a lot more authentic than the unoriginal ending of The Force Awakens. It's just unfortunate we saw so much of it in the trailers and press material. Interestingly enough, it's a lot less kid-friendly than most of the other films in the sense there's nothing half as lame as a CGI Yoda doing parkour, and I think a lot of children will have a hard time following what's going on. The best part of it all is director Gareth Edwards may have just opened a door to a darker, harder Star Wars spin-off in the foreseeable future, which is all I ever wanted since Star Wars 1313 was announced (and cruelly canceled).

I don't think this is a movie for everyone, even though just about anyone can enjoy it. I think it's a movie intended for people who sincerely can't get enough of Star Wars. And don't worry about showing up late because they played nine (mostly terrible) trailers before the movie started.

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