Friday, April 7, 2017

Logan (2017) [Midnight Movie]


I generally like MCU movies (more than X-Men movies, in fact), but the stylistic continuity is limiting to what the filmmakers can do. Each movie is different, to an extent, but directors aren't allowed a whole lot of breathing room, which is a shame because the franchise attracts such big names. I want to see Kenneth Branagh make a Kenneth Branagh movie starring Thor, not a run-of-the-mill MCU movie. Meanwhile, Edgar Wright's removal from Ant-Man still feels like we missed out on something great.

X-Men's stylistic continuity, on the other hand, has been thoroughly torched, tossed out the window, and struck by a large truck. The varying tone has made the franchise a little spotty (to put it nicely), but it's apparently given director James Mangold a whole lot of breathing room—the same kind of breathing room Christopher Nolan had when he rebooted the Batman franchise. 

This isn't a Wolverine film. It's a James Mangold film. And it's probably my favorite mainstream comic book movie since Richard Donner's Superman. I've merely liked X-Men movies up until now. Here's the first one I loved.


It's notable something this different got made with such a huge IP. It just doesn't move like a carefully plotted action movie. It moves like a deliberate drama and feels like a classic western. Usually when I see these movies, I'm reminded of all the other comic book movies. This one reminded me of Clint Eastwood's A Perfect World and Unforgiven.

The first time we see Logan, he's sleeping off a hangover in the back of the limo he drives for a living. He's awakened by the sound of thugs trying to steal his wheels. He tells them exactly what you'd expect Wolverine to say: "You don't want to do this." Yet you get the feeling Logan's talking to himself this time. He's old, he's limping, and when the thugs shoot him, the wounds remain for the remainder of the movie. He's also experiencing a bit of blade-extension dysfunction.

It turns out Logan's healing factor gets weaker the older he gets and, as a result, he's experiencing the effects of adamantium poisoning. (He's something like two hundred years old at this point... it's especially amusing to see the world famous hero require reading glasses.) Logan lives with Professor X and the mutant albino Caliban (Stephen Merchant, who's great in the role) in the middle of nowhere. It's likely they're the last mutants alive. Charles is worse for the wear than Logan; the first time we see the professor he's zooming about jerkily in his wheelchair, mumbling like a madman. Sometimes he has seizures, which puts everybody within a large radius at risk of death by telepathic shock.

And Charles cusses now... a lot. He's gotten quite curmudgeonly in his old age, earning some of the best laughs in the movie. Patrick Stewart manages to play him with equal amounts of realism and dignity. 


One day Logan is hired to drive a woman and her daughter across the country. It turns out the little girl is more than what she appears to be: she has mutant abilities which are suspiciously like Wolverine's. Naturally, the secret lab responsible for her existence sends their highly militarized security team to get her back. The leader of the team is the film's villain, Donald Pierce (Boyd Holbrook). Pierce doesn't like "muties" and refers to his band of cyber-enhanced killers as "the good guys." This is probably the best movie villain since Fury Road's Immortan Joe.

There's a bit of a surprise about midway through the movie. I'm amazed the trailers haven't spoiled it. Lately, there have been a lot of surprises in movies like this, but when the surprises are, "Oh, look, another crossover cameo," they kind of lose their effectiveness, don't they? The surprise in Logan isn't like that at all. It's jarring, yes, but far from distracting.

What's special about Logan is it sticks with you like a real fucking movie. I'm still piecing together some of the backstory and it occurred to me, a day later, that a lot of this stuff had deeper meaning than I initially thought. The balls-to-the-wall action at the end almost feels at odds with the rest of the movie, but maybe the movie earned it.

I saw the trailer for Justice League after watching Logan and I've gotta be honest: I pretty much couldn't care less. I have a feeling a lot of superhero movies are going to feel old hat compared to this one. There are certain ways these movies comfort us, even when we're sick of being comforted, so I'm not convinced this is the right time for the DCU to adopt a Saturday morning cartoon vibe. Meanwhile, Logan has more in common with The Road than its own franchise. And man, it feels so damn fresh.

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