Friday, December 8, 2017

The Disaster Artist (2017) [Midnight Movie]


The Disaster Artist was easily my most anticipated movie of the year, if only because I loved the book it was based on. For the uninitiated, Hollywood hopeful Greg Sestero (Dave Franco) begins an unlikely friendship with the mysteriously odd Tommy Wiseau (James Franco) and it's not long before the two of them cohabit an apartment in LA. Sestero finds modest success in the movie industry while Wiseau, who likens himself to James Dean despite his ghoulish appearance, struggles with auditions.

When a Hollywood producer informs him he'll never be a star, Wiseau decides to make his own movie the only way he knows how: very oddly. He buys his equipment outright, which is pretty much unheard of in Hollywood, and he builds sets despite having access to the real world locations that appear in his script. As in real life, whenever someone questions the way Wiseau does something, he tells them in that untraceable accent of his, "Because this is real Hollywood movie."


The concept is ripe for comedy and the movie certainly delivers, but if there's anything disappointing about The Disaster Artist it's the brevity of it. The movie is only 105 minutes long and that's including celebrity interviews at the beginning of the film and scene-by-scene comparisons at the end. That stuff is fun to watch, but it feels more like extra features than something to put in your final cut. (I heard Franco and company remade more than forty minutes of Wiseau's movie, so hopefully we can expect to see it on the Blu-Ray.)

There were a lot of details left out, too. Its absence is understandable, but I would have loved to see Franco's take on the fake commercial Wiseau shot in order to get himself into SAG. And although the book wasn't full of drama, I think the movie could have used more of it. They kind of breeze over the more worrisome aspects of Wiseau's indecipherable psyche, which somehow made me less sympathetic to the fictionalized version than the real one. My only other complaint is the cameos are kind of pointless; you'll say, "Hey, it's Sharon Stone!" but, like the breast cancer subplot in Wiseau's film, you'll wonder where the payoff went.

I'm not sure I'd trust the Oscar buzz because it's a straight comedy and James Franco's performance, which is a great impersonation with a surprising amount of range, isn't exactly what the Academy is typically looking for. I say fuck 'em. It's a great time at the movies, just don't expect this generation's Ed Wood.

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