Friday, December 8, 2017

The Disaster Artist (2017) [Midnight Movie]


The Disaster Artist was easily my most anticipated movie of the year, if only because I loved the book it was based on. For the uninitiated, Hollywood hopeful Greg Sestero (Dave Franco) begins an unlikely friendship with the mysteriously odd Tommy Wiseau (James Franco) and it's not long before the two of them cohabit an apartment in LA. Sestero finds modest success in the movie industry while Wiseau, who likens himself to James Dean despite his ghoulish appearance, struggles with auditions.

When a Hollywood producer informs him he'll never be a star, Wiseau decides to make his own movie the only way he knows how: very oddly. He buys his equipment outright, which is pretty much unheard of in Hollywood, and he builds sets despite having access to the real world locations that appear in his script. As in real life, whenever someone questions the way Wiseau does something, he tells them in that untraceable accent of his, "Because this is real Hollywood movie."


The concept is ripe for comedy and the movie certainly delivers, but if there's anything disappointing about The Disaster Artist it's the brevity of it. The movie is only 105 minutes long and that's including celebrity interviews at the beginning of the film and scene-by-scene comparisons at the end. That stuff is fun to watch, but it feels more like extra features than something to put in your final cut. (I heard Franco and company remade more than forty minutes of Wiseau's movie, so hopefully we can expect to see it on the Blu-Ray.)

There were a lot of details left out, too. Its absence is understandable, but I would have loved to see Franco's take on the fake commercial Wiseau shot in order to get himself into SAG. And although the book wasn't full of drama, I think the movie could have used more of it. They kind of breeze over the more worrisome aspects of Wiseau's indecipherable psyche, which somehow made me less sympathetic to the fictionalized version than the real one. My only other complaint is the cameos are kind of pointless; you'll say, "Hey, it's Sharon Stone!" but, like the breast cancer subplot in Wiseau's film, you'll wonder where the payoff went.

I'm not sure I'd trust the Oscar buzz because it's a straight comedy and James Franco's performance, which is a great impersonation with a surprising amount of range, isn't exactly what the Academy is typically looking for. I say fuck 'em. It's a great time at the movies, just don't expect this generation's Ed Wood.

Friday, December 1, 2017

Bram Stoker's Dracula (1992) [Midnight Movie]


They could have fixed 70% of my problems with Bram Stoker's Dracula if they had just called it Francis Ford Coppola's Dracula. The problem isn't that the movie isn't as good as the book—that's just par for the course. The problem is, with a title like that, you'd expect them to take far fewer liberties than they did, especially considering the novel itself was remarkably cinematic for its time. 

The scene in which Dracula is spotted crawling across the wall is chilling in the imagination, but it's lacking something on the screen. Likewise, there's some great visual effects, but Coppola leaves them on display for too long while Keanu Reeves somehow manages not to react whatsoever. I appreciate the shameless use of old fashioned sets and sound stages, but the look of the film hearkens back to previous film adaptations even though the bold title suggests it's intended to be more novel than movie.


Then there's Keanu Reeves and Winona Ryder who are outrageously miscast for the project. Phony accents aside, I wouldn't go so far as to say I hated them in this movie because I actually think they could have been good in a different Dracula project. They just weren't cut out for this Dracula project, which feels like an unhappy marriage between a studio flick and a pretentious art film. The rest of the cast, with the exception of Tom Waits, is more or less spot on. Anthony Hopkins as Van Helsing is a dream come true, at least when the script doesn't have him acting out of character, and the movie could have used more of Richard E. Grant, Cary Elwes, and Billy Campbell as Lucy's suitors. The hunt scenes involving these players really are a spectacle; it's just everything leading up to these scenes I'm not so sure about.

I guess I should mention Gary Oldman as Dracula, but I really don't know what to say. He's good here, I suppose, but I can't decide if he's "Gary Oldman good" or if he's substandard compared to the rest of his filmography. This is at least the second time I've seen this movie and I still feel like there was too much stuff distracting me from Oldman's performance.


Once it gets going, the movie frequently comes close to genuine thrills, but never really delivers the goods until heads are lopped off and blood is spewed at our heroes. The horror elements can be damn near perfect at times and the score is great throughout (I often listen to it while I write). It should be noted there was a fantastic pinball machine based on the film as well. But then the pacing is off and Coppola throws in a handful of what-the-fuck moments for no apparent reason.

It's a highly watchable movie, but it doesn't quite reach its potential. Usually I'm interested in seeing a director's cut, but I'm beginning to think the studio cut of this movie is possibly better; I'm not really sure what Coppola was going for at times. I don't think he did, either.

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Corpus Evil is OOZING into retailers now!


Corpus Evil ($2.99) is now available to pre-order on Barnes & Noble and Kobo! Other major retailers coming soon! Please excuse the use of exclamation points! Apparently I'm supposed to use them now!

Things around here are going to be a little different while I get a grip on how to launch a book. I still plan to post something each week, but it probably won't be the usual stuff. Rest assured I eventually want to go back to the old format.

Corpus Evil launches on April 1st, 2018 (Easter Sunday) with the next book coming out the following September (Labor Day). Which means that, for the first time in my life, I'm actually on strict deadlines for my writerly duties. These self-imposed deadlines have actually benefited my writing habits, but I still don't know what the next book is going to be about... it's currently a toss-up between a horror story and a weird science fiction/fantasy/western/post-apocalyptic thing. All I know is I start the first draft on December 28th and I hope to have the promotional stuff ready by the time Corpus Evil goes on sale.

To give you an idea of what the deadlines look like: it took well over a month to get the first part of Corpus Evil into shape, but to stick to my schedule I'll only have around a week for each of the remaining four parts. I also have to convert this blog to HTTPS, spend a little more time on social media, and work on other promotion-related boring stuff. This is a terrifying prospect for someone who's an introvert six days out of the week, but it looks like I'll be joining Facebook soon... yay.

In the meantime, feel free to follow me on my Instagram and Twitter accounts! I'll try to be more active!

Thursday, November 23, 2017

Corpus Evil coming April 1st, 2018


Levi could talk his friends into anything. When he convinces the gang to spend a night in an abandoned church camp, he awakens something which will haunt the survivors for eternity.

Smashwords listing.

Price

$2.99, available pretty much wherever e-books are sold.

Release Date

April 1st, 2018.

ARCs

If you want to read it for free, I'll be sending out advanced reader copies on January 17th, 2018 (e-books). Send me an email if you're interested. First come, first served.

Review Copies

If you have a blog or anything like that, review copies will go out sometime in March. It doesn't matter how big or small your blog is, just provide proof it exists and I'll send you a free e-book with no obligation to review, no questions asked.

More info to come. I'll have a meatier synopsis up soon.

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Creepshow (1982) [31 Days of Gore]


I wanted to end this year's 31 Days of Gore with something special. The entire month I've been carefully considering which movie it should be. It turns out I can think of few movies more quintessential to my childhood than Creepshow. It was probably my introduction to King, Romero, and Savini, it sports an unbelievable soundtrack by John Harrington (which I listen to quite a bit), and possibly replicates the experience of reading an issue of EC horror more accurately than HBO's Tales from the Crypt. Never mind the fact it barely works as a horror film, it has a killer cast and every person in it knows exactly what kind of movie they're making, which is rare when you have so many different kinds of actors.

In the container story, an angry father (Tom Atkins) reprimands his son (Joe Hill) for the horror comic he finds in his bedroom. The comic looks suspiciously like Tales from the Crypt, Vault of Horror, and The Haunt of Fear, right down to the style of the advertisements found inside. The father calls it sick filth and tosses it in the trash. Once the boy is alone, he wishes his father would rot in hell, at which point a ghoul appears at his window to tell him the stories from the comic book in person. Cue the opening credits, which are colorful and fun. (Seriously, why do so many modern movies skip the tone-setting credits?)


The first story features Carrie Nye, Ed Harris, and Viveca Lindfors, and it's probably the weakest of the group, but it has a great line ("I want my Father's Day cake!") and the hokey feel of a campfire story. I complain about stereotypical characters in horror movies all the time, but these characters are hyper-stereotypical and intentionally so. That's part of the reason the film is so successful at feeling like the material which inspired it: it revels in being pulp.

In the next story Stephen King plays Jordy Verrill, a country bumpkin who discovers a fallen meteorite. Much like that moment in The Blob, touching the meteorite is a very bad idea; it infects Verrill's hand with some sort of alien substance resembling chia grass. King might be the worst actor in the entire movie, delivering a performance which would make Jerry Lewis roll his eyes, but that's not a complaint. He's obviously having a blast and it's just as contagious as the stuff growing on his hand.


Following the conclusion of King's segment, Leslie Nelson gets the best lines of the entire movie in his portrayal of a rich maniac who goes to far-fetched lengths to punish his wife's lover (Ted Danson). Although he plays it straight, Nelson is doing something completely different than what he did in Airplane and Naked Gun; maybe he's not as funny here, but he's definitely the character who made me laugh the most. It might even be my favorite segment of the movie because he's so cartoonishly evil you can't help but root for him to do terrible things... so that you can root for terrible things to happen to him later.

It seems that the penultimate story, The Crate, is everybody's favorite. In it, Adrienne Barbeau (who also appeared in Romero's half of Two Evil Eyes) plays a loud-mouthed alcoholic whose husband (Hal Holbrook) fantasizes about killing her. Meanwhile, a friend of theirs discovers a mysterious crate beneath the stairs of the local university. I can certainly see why this is the fan-favorite, and it was probably mine, too, at one point or another, but I found this one was the biggest candidate for trimming some of the movie's two-hour runtime.

The final story the ghoul tells was probably my least favorite as a kid, but I've grown quite fond of it. This analysis is at least partly responsible, but I discovered creepy crawlies are much more effective to me now than I was a kid. My girlfriend, who I've never known to squirm during a movie (with the exception of Ichi the Killer) almost couldn't stand to watch it. In it, E.G. Marshall plays a rich and powerful hermit whose sterile home is infiltrated by cockroaches.

I don't know what, exactly, elevates Creepshow so high above its aspirations, but there are so few things that make me so gleeful. Creepshow 2 ain't a bad movie either, but the end of that film is where I part ways with the franchise. Don't ever expect me to feature Creepshow 3 and the internet-only Creepshow Raw... they really are that bad.


That's it for this year's 31 Days of Gore. It was the breeziest one yet.